“Uncovering the Details of Apple’s DMA Guidelines: 25 Essential Truths for App Developers”

Apple last week announced new rules for EU app developers to comply with new regulation, the Digital Markets Act (DMA). Meanwhile, the company is implementing a Core Technology Fee that Apple says pays for their access to Apple’s proprietary technologies and tools, developer services and support, and platform integrity. This fee applies to apps both distributed on the App Store and through alternative marketplaces and is €0.50 for each first annual install per year over a 1 million threshold. After digging through the documents Apple provided and speaking to the company, there are a few caveats and details to these rules that developers should know. We’re compiling them below as a starting point and will add to this list over time as we learn more.

Last week, Apple announced new rules for EU app developers in order to comply with the Digital Markets Act (DMA), a newly implemented regulation. As a designated “gatekeeper” in the EU, Apple was required to make changes in order to promote competition within the app industry.

These changes include offering new ways for users to download apps from outside of the App Store, implementing new frameworks and APIs, revising their commission and fee structure, and more.

While the response from developers has been mixed, with some larger companies such as Epic Games, Spotify, and Microsoft opposing the changes, others see it as a way for Apple to continue profiting from iPhone apps regardless of how they are discovered and installed.

Under the new rules, EU developers will see a reduced commission rate of either 17% for digital transactions and services, or 10% for those who qualify for a small business discount (or subscriptions in the second year). However, Apple will continue to charge an additional 3% if the company uses their payment processing service.

In addition to this, Apple is introducing a Core Technology Fee for access to their proprietary technologies, tools, developer services and support, and platform integrity. This applies to apps distributed on the App Store as well as alternative marketplaces and is €0.50 for each first annual install per year over a threshold of 1 million.

But the changes don’t stop there. Apple is also offering more options, such as the ability for users to choose their default web browser and for developers to tap into NFC payment technology for their own apps.

While digging through the provided documents and speaking with the company, a few caveats and details have emerged that developers should be aware of. We’ve compiled them below as a starting point and will continue to add to the list as more information becomes available.

  • EU app developers must comply with new rules put in place by the Digital Markets Act (DMA).
  • Apple, as a designated “gatekeeper,” has made changes to promote competition within the app industry.
  • Changes include offering new ways to download apps, implementing new frameworks and APIs, and revising their commission and fee structure.
  • Larger companies such as Epic Games, Spotify, and Microsoft have opposed Apple’s changes, while others see it as a way for the company to continue profiting from iPhone apps.
  • EU developers will see a reduced commission rate, but there is still an additional 3% charge for using Apple’s payment processing service.
  • A Core Technology Fee is also being implemented for access to Apple’s proprietary technologies and tools, and applies to both the App Store and alternative marketplaces.
  • Apple is also offering additional options such as choosing default web browsers and tapping into NFC payment technology.
  • Developers should be aware of caveats and details in Apple’s documents and continue to stay updated on changes.
Avatar photo
Zara Khan

Zara Khan is a seasoned investigative journalist with a focus on social justice issues. She has won numerous awards for her groundbreaking reporting and has a reputation for fearlessly exposing wrongdoing.

Articles: 806

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *